Quote

V for Vendetta Guy Fawkes

“Remember, remember the fifth of November of gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the gun powder treason should ever be forgot.”

 

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guy Fawkes was a man who took action though it did not succeed he made an impact showing words are perspectives and Words never DIE and taking action!
they claimed  Fawkes was “a man highly skilled in matters of war”, and that it was this mixture of piety and professionalism which endeared him to his fellow conspirators.The author Antonia Fraser describes Fawkes as “a tall, powerfully built man, with thick reddish-brown hair, a flowing moustache in the tradition of the time, and a bushy reddish-brown beard”, and that he was “a man of action … capable of intelligent argument as well as physical endurance, somewhat to the surprise of his enemies.”
Gunpowder Plot
Three illustrations in a horizontal alignment.  The leftmost shows a woman praying, in a room.  The rightmost shows a similar scene.  The centre image shows a horizon filled with buildings, from across a river.  The caption reads "Westminster".  At the top of the image, "The Gunpowder Plot" begins a short description of the document's contents.

A late 17th or early 18th-century report of the plot
Details
Participants Robert CatesbyJohn Wright,Thomas WintourThomas PercyGuy FawkesRobert KeyesThomas BatesRobert WintourChristopher WrightJohn GrantAmbrose RookwoodSir Everard Digby andFrancis Tresham
Location London, England
Date 5 November 1605
Result Failure, plotters executed

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called theGunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotlandby a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England’s Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James’s nine-year-old daughter,Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed. His fellow plotters were John Wright,Thomas WintourThomas PercyGuy FawkesRobert KeyesThomas BatesRobert WintourChristopher WrightJohn GrantAmbrose RookwoodSir Everard Digby and Francis Tresham. Fawkes, who had 10 years of military experience fighting in the Spanish Netherlands in suppression of the Dutch Revolt, was given charge of the explosives.

The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter sent toWilliam Parker, 4th Baron Monteagle, on 26 October 1605. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder—enough to reduce the House of Lords to rubble—and arrested. Most of the conspirators fled from London as they learned of the plot’s discovery, trying to enlist support along the way. Several made a stand against the pursuing Sheriff of Worcester and his men at Holbeche House; in the ensuing battle Catesby was one of those shot and killed. At their trial on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

Details of the assassination attempt were allegedly known by the principal Jesuit of England, Father Henry Garnet. Although he was convicted of treason and sentenced to death, doubt has been cast on how much he really knew of the plot. As its existence was revealed to him through confession, Garnet was prevented from informing the authorities by the absolute confidentiality of the confessional. Although anti-Catholic legislation was introduced soon after the plot’s discovery, many important and loyal Catholics retained high office during King James I’s reign. The thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot was commemorated for many years afterwards by special sermons and other public events such as the ringing of church bells, which have evolved into the Bonfire Night of today.

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