Sky News & Events For The Rest Of 2016

  • July 19Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 22:57 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.
  • July 28, 29Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht. The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29. The second quarter moon will block most of the fainter meteors this year but if you are patient you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • August 2New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 20:44 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • August 11, 12Perseids Meteor Shower. The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862. The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors. The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 11 and the morning of August 12. The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for should be an excellent early morning show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • August 16Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 27.4 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.
  • August 18Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 09:26 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.
  • August 27Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. A spectacular conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible in the evening sky. The two bright planets will be extremely close, appearing only 0.06 degrees apart. Look for this impressive pairing in the western sky just after sunset.
  • September 1New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 09:03 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • September 1Annular Solar Eclipse. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun. This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon. The Sun’s corona is not visible during an annular eclipse. The path of the eclipse will begin off the eastern coast of central Africa and travel through Gabon, Congo, Tanzania, and Madagascar before ending in the Indian Ocean. A partial eclipse will be visible throughout most of Africa and the Indian Ocean. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information) (NASA Interactive Google Map)
  • September 3Neptune at Opposition. The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune. Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.
  • September 16Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 19:05 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year. This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.
  • September 16Penumbral Lunar Eclipse. A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s partial shadow, or penumbra. During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely. The eclipse will be visible throughout most of eastern Europe, eastern Africa, Asia, and western Australia. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information)
  • September 22September Equinox. The September equinox occurs at 14:21 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • September 28Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 17.9 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.
  • October 1New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 00:11 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • October 7Draconids Meteor Shower. The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900. The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers. The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th. The first quarter moon will block the fainter meteors in the early evening. It will set shortly after midnight leaving darker skies for observing any lingering stragglers. Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • October 15Uranus at Opposition. The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view Uranus. Due to its distance, the planet will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.
  • October 16Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 04:23 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt. This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon. This is also the first of three supermoons for 2016. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.
  • October 20, 21Orionids Meteor Shower. The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • October 30New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 17:38 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • November 4, 5Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke. The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10. It peaks this year on the the night of November 4. The first quarter moon will set just after midnight leaving dark skies for viewing. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • November 14Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 13:52 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze. It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter’s Moon. This is also the second of three supermoons for 2016. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.
  • November 16, 17Leonids Meteor Shower. The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 16th and morning of the 17th. The waning gibbous moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year, but if you are patient you should be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • November 29New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 12:18 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • December 11Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 20.8 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.
  • December 13, 14Geminids Meteor Shower. The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The nearly full moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • December 14Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 00:06 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark. This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule. This is also the last of three supermoons for 2016. The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.
  • December 21December Solstice. The December solstice occurs at 10:44 UTC. The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude. This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • December 21, 22Ursids Meteor Shower. The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. The second quarter moon will block many of the fainter meteors. But if you are patient, you might still be able to catch a few of the brighter ones. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
  • December 29New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 06:53 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
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Grow your own herbs! For the cheap witch!

I understand that some of us have apartments and do not have a green thumb but, here are reasons why you should grow them its for the strong cheap witch! It makes your spells stronger because you are connected to the ingredients!
Throughout history, herbs have played a major role in ritual and magick. Our ancestors used herbs in potions, incense, and amulets that were made for protection and to ward off evil and illness. Since most herbs are relatively easy to grow and oftentimes require little space, modern-day Pagans, Witches, and Wiccans can also utilize the fragrant gifts of home-grown herbs in their magickal lives.

Here’s some tips on when, where, and how to make a magickal herb garden as well as the magickal properties of some of the more familiar herbs.

Indoors or Out

Magickal herb gardens can be planted indoors or out and be grown in the ground or in containers and pots. For outdoor herb gardens, Spring, Summer, and early Fall are good times to start one in most locations. In temperate climates, herbs can be planted and grown outside almost year round. For those of us in colder climates, herbs can be started outdoors and then moved inside when colder temperatures prevail. Indoor herb gardens can be started just about any time of year. The main thing to remember is that whether indoors or out, herbs love warm, sunny places and thrive best with at least six hours of sunlight. Southern and western exposures seem to work best.

Don’t have a yard or don’t think you have enough room for a magickal herb garden? Think again! It doesn’t matter if you have a large spread or a tiny apartment, herbs can be grown on window sills, balconies, porches, patios, and decks. Just look around your front and back doors, porch steps, or kitchen window for a location with the most available sunshine.

Containers or In-Ground

Should you decide to grow your magical herbs in containers, you can grow them in multiple pots grouped together on a window sill or plant several herbs together in one large planter on a porch. Aside from the usual nursery or garden section of a home improvement store, thrift stores and yard sales are great places to hunt for containers. You can also use tin coffee cans, metal buckets, or large old roasting pans. Almost any container is suitable as long as it has a few holes on the bottom for drainage. If needed, holes can be pierced in the bottom of most metal containers with a large nail and hammer. Even if you have very little yard space available, you can still probably plant a magickal herb garden in the ground. A fairly good variety of herbs can be planted in a sunny area that is no larger than two feet by three feet. You can also create raised beds for planting out of stacked pieces of landscape blocks, wooden railroad ties, whiskey barrels, or even old metal wash basins.

Whether indoors or out, you can grow your magickal herbs from seeds or from seedlings. Just remember to check and follow the growing directions printed on the packet or pot for the herbs you choose. If planting herbs together in the same pot, be sure to group herbs with similar growing instructions and watering needs together.

Some herbs have a reputation for growing well even in poor soils, but average soil with good drainage will suit just about all species. For herbs grown indoors or in containers, choose a light potting soil with a high sand content to ensure good drainage. Most herbs need their soil to be kept damp, but not WET, so don’t overwater. It’s safest to water in small amounts. For plants grown outdoors in the ground, a layer of mulch around the herbs will curb the growth of weeds, help keep the herbs clean, and protect the soil from the sun baking it around the roots.

Harvesting and Drying

Herbs have two cycles of growth: a leaf-growing cycle and a reproduction cycles when they begin to flower. Most magickal herbs are at their most potent when harvested during the leaf-growing cycle just before they flower. This is because the oils have settled into the leaves and are at their highest level. The best time of day to harvest is in the morning right after any dew has dried. You still can harvest herbs after they begin to flower, but the leaves may become tougher or more bitter to the taste during this stage of growth making them a tad less potent. The exception to this is in harvesting those herbs in which the flowers comprise the main harvest, such as camomile, lavender, and marigold. In this instance, the herbs should be cut when the flowers are in full bloom. Regardless of when you cut your herbs, each time you harvest a sprig, be sure to pinch the stem back to a set of leaves to promote new leaf growth.

Once harvested, your magickal herbs should be air-dried in a relatively cool, dry, and shady location. Air-drying is greatly preferred over oven drying, as artificial heat removes some of the oil inside the leaves. There are two different methods for drying herbs. One calls for hanging up herbs in bundles or bunches to dry. This is done by gathering your cut herbs into bundles or bunches, each about the thickness of what you can grasp in one hand. Tie each bundle or bunch together using twine or string or use a rubberband to gather one end of stems together. Then, hang it upside down for drying. A dry garage or out-of-the-way kitchen shelf are good places to hang your herbs to dry.

The other method for drying herbs is to spread the herbs in a single layer on a wire netting or rack. An old window screen covered with a cheesecloth makes a good drying rack. Place the screen where there is cross ventilation so that air reaches it from above and below. Make sure the screen is stored in a shady, cool, and dry location while the herbs are drying on it.

Do not place the herbs in a plastic bag or sealed container of any kind until thoroughly dry as doing so will keep moisture inside the plant. This promotes the growth of mold and can possibly rot the herbs. How long it takes to completely dry depends on the humidity and temperature of the location you choose as well as the thickness of the stems and the amount of moisture inside the herb’s stems and leaves. It could take anywhere from several days or weeks to even a month or more. Dryness can usually be determined by crushing a leaf. If it’s crisp and breaks into little pieces, it’s dry enough to store. When growing and harvesting plants for magickal work, be sure to allow more than enough time for them to thoroughly dry before you’ll need them for ritual and spell work.

Once the herbs have completely dried, store them in sealed containers, and if possible, keep them in a dark place. Your herbs will retain their color and potency much longer this way. Glass containers are best, but sturdy plastic ones can also be used. Resist storing herbs for any length of time in plastic bags as the scents end up mingling together, and the herbs lose their potency fairly quickly. Be sure to label and date the containers. All herbs meant for ingesting and cooking should be used within six months. It is also recommended that herbs destined for use in ritual and spells also be used within six months for maximum effectiveness. But in any event, all herbs earmarked for ritual and magickal works should be used within a year of harvesting. After a year, their potency is very weak, and their effectiveness is greatly diminished. If you feel bad about throwing out any unused herbs, you can save them for use in crafts, if desired.

Annuals, Perennials, and Biennials

Once you’ve decided to grow a magickal herb garden, how do you know what herbs to select? Here’s a brief explanation of the three basic types of herbs and some magickal properties of a few specific herbs to help you make your selections.

Like all plants, herbs can be classifed as annual, perennial, orbiennial plants. Annual herbs bloom for one season only. They flower during the Summer and Fall, and then die. They need to be sown by seed anew each year. Examples of annual herbs include:

Basil
Chamomile
Cumin
Dill

Once established, perennial herbs come back every year. They survive the Winter to bloom each season. Examples of perennial herbs include:

Mint
Oregano
Rosemary
Sage
Thyme

Biennial herbs live for only two years. They sprout from seeds the first season, but usually don’t flower until the second, after which they die. Biennial herbs are somewhat rare, and include:

Caraway
Parsley

Herbs for Protection

The following herbs all have protective properties good for repelling negative vibrations or energy. They disperse negativity and create a protective barrier when burned, carried on your person, or hung wherever needed. Please note that this list in not all inclusive:

Angelica
Basil
Dill
Fennel
Garlic
Horehound
Hyssop
Mistletoe
Mugwort
Pennyroyal
Rose Geranium
Rosemary
Rue
St. John’s Wort
Tarragon
Vervain
**An example of a simple protective spell is to make an amulet using any three of the above herbs. Mix them together, and place the mixture in the center of a small piece of red or white cloth. Gather up the corners, and tie it closed with a red ribbon. Hold the amulet in your projective hand (the one you write with) and the amulet by chanting the following three times:

“By Water, Earth, Fire and Air
Protect that for which I care!”

Carry the amulet with you in your pocket or purse. To protect you in the car, place it under your seat or in the glovebox. To protect your home, place it near the fireplace or hang it over the front door or over the door to your room.

Herbs for Purification

Sometimes, we can sense the presence of negative energy in our home, work place, or even in the car. Or, perhaps you’re feeling out of sorts or just have a general feeling that something isn’t quite right. In these instances, magickal works pertaining to purification will probably set things straight once again. Purification spells are also done to purify a new home or apartment to remove any energies left by the prior tenants. The following herbs all have purifying properties. This list is not all inclusive:

Basil
Bay
Juniper
Mugwort
Yarrow
Rosemary
Sage

**An example of a house purification spell is to make a powder from three (or multiples of three) purification herbs. Pulverize the powders and make a loose incense for burning over charcoal. As you mix the powdered herbs together, visualize a clean breeze blowing all the negativity out of the house. If possible, open all the windows in the house. Light the incense. Carry the smouldering incense, and slowly walk from room to room. As you do so, visualize the smoke from the incense driving away any remnants of negativity.

**Another purification spell that can be done to remove negativity from a home or workplace is to brew a strong rosemary tea. Then, dip a branch of rosemary or yarrow into the tea, and use it to thoroughly sprinkle drops of the tea in every room. While doing this, visualize all negative influences be washed away.

**Another popular method for purifying is by smudging with sage. Harvest and then dry sage that has been tied into small bundles or bunches with cotton string or twine. When thoroughly dry, light a small sage bundle. Use a heatproof saucer or plate underneath, and carry the smoldering sage from room to room. Visualize all negativity being replaced by the purifying fragrance of the sage.

Charm bags are bags that are made, filled with specific ingredients, and then for a particular purpose. They are then carried or kept close to the person for whom they are meant to help, usually for a specified period of time. The following are some examples of charm bags using magickal herbs.

**Prosperity Charm Bag

On the New Moon, make a small bag out of green fabric or cut a square out of green fabric. Place three bay leaves and a small lodestone inside the bag or in the center of the square. If using a square of fabric, gather up the four corners and tie closed with a gold or green ribbon. If using a bag, tie the bag closed with a gold or green ribbon. Anoint the bag with a drop of almond oil or patchouli while chanting three times:

“Fortune smile on me this day
May all I need come my way”

Carry the bag in your pocket or purse from the New Moon until the Full Moon. At the Full Moon, bury the bag in the ground or in a deep planter or pot of dirt.

**Love Charm Bag

The purpose of this spell is to attract love into your life, NOT to attract a specific person.

Any time after the New Moon, make a small bag out of pink or red cloth. Add a piece of rose quartz inside, and fill the rest of the bag with lavender and pine needles.Tie the bag closed with a pink or white ribbon. Anoint the bag with patchouli or rose oil while chanting three times:

“By Air, Earth, Fire and Sea
Open my heart!
Bring love to me”

Sleep with the charm bag under your pillow until you get results.

This Health Charm Bag is created to attract good health or to maintain good health. During the waxing phase of the Moon, make a small blue or purple bag. Inside the bag, add a small piece of amethyst. Then, fill the bag with lavender, sage, and St. John’s Wort. Tie it closed with a purple ribbon. Anoint the bag with oil of peppermint or spearmint while chanting three times:

“Keep my mind and body strong and fit
Strengthen both my heart and wit”

Sleep with the bag under your pillow at night. Keep this bag as long as necessary. Burn or bury it when no longer needed.

Happy Samhain! Day of the Dead!

Sorry I’ve been away for a bit but ive been writing for The vampire diaries and The Originals! But here is a couple things about samhain and spells to help catch up for samhain!

The veil between the worlds is thinnest at Halloween. Take advantage of this to cast extra-powerful spells, read the future and communicate with spirits who have passed on.

Here’s How:

  1. Plan your guest list:Figure out how many people you’re going to have — and make sure the space you’re using will allow them all. If your living room only seats eight people comfortably, don’t invite fifteen! Also, be sure that everyone attending is open-minded to the spirit world. People who are adamantly “non-believers” bring a certain amount of negative energy, and this can be disruptive. You may also find that it adversely effects your communication with the spirits during your séance.
  2. Create a Spirit-Friendly Atmosphere: Most people like to conduct a séance at a round or oval table, but if neither is available, don’t worry. Drape the table with fabric or sheets — some people prefer light colors to attract “friendly” spirits, but it’s a matter or personal preference. If you use incense, be sure that no one in your group is allergic to it. Place incense somewhere away from the table, rather than on the table itself. Candles are a nice addition as well — not only do they provide some visibility, but there’s a school of thought that believes spirits are attracted to heat and light sources.
  3. Common Sense: Help everyone get comfortable by offering refreshments before you begin. Make sure that guests will be respectful of the spirits, and of other guests. Turn off all cell phones. If anyone needs to go to the bathroom or have a smoke, do so before you begin. Set the thermostat at a comfortable temperature — remember that spirit activity can cause some fluctuation in levels of cold or heat. Once everyone is seated, you can help everyone relax by doing a short guided mediation, offering a prayer, or casting a protective circle, if your tradition requires you to do so.
  4. During the Seance: Although many people like to do this, you don’t have to hold hands to raise energy. In fact, if a séance goes on too long, it can get downright uncomfortable. Whoever is acting as the leader of the séance — the medium — should ask the spirits to join the group. If there is a specific spirit you are trying to contact, ask for them by name. For example, now would be the time to say, “Dear Auntie Gertrude, we respectfully ask that you honor us with your presence this evening.” In some séances, spirits are summoned by chanting — this will be up to your medium to decide on.
  5. As long as the spirits seem willing to reply, you can carry on a question and answer session with them. Bear in mind that spirits respond in many different ways. Sometimes there will be a tangible reaction — a tap, a thump, a soft breeze. Other times — particularly if you have a room full of very psychically gifted people — the spirit may choose to respond through another person. This may be the medium, or any other guest. The individual may simply “get a message” to pass along, which they would then share, such as, “Your Auntie Gertrude wants you to know she isn’t in pain any more.”
  6. Party Time: Sometimes, particularly if you have a group of psychically gifted individuals as guests, you may get several spirits arriving all at once, chattering away. This is not cause for alarm, but it does take some managing, because they’ve all got something to say. Treat it like you would any other conversation with a large group of people — let each spirit get their turn to deliver the message they came with, and then move on to the next one. Also, bear in mind that not all spirits are from departed humans — deceased pets may also have a message to pass along.
  7. Unwanted Entities: Just like at any other party, sometimes a séance will bring an uninvited guest. In this case, when you have a spirit that seems malevolent or mischievous, someone needs to let them know they’re unwelcome. Typically, this will be the medium who is leading the séance, who will usually say something like, “You are not wanted here, but we thank you for your presence. Now it is time for you to move on.”

    If an entity arrives that seems angry or hostile and will not leave, no matter what you do, end the séance. Chances are good that it’s been attracted to someone in your group who is dysfunctional.

  8. Closing the Door: When you’re done with the séance, it’s important that guests thank the spirits for coming to visit. After all, you would do so if you had living guests drop in!

    If one of your attendees seems to have slipped into a trance or a sleep-like state during the séance, allow them to return gradually, on their own. Do NOT shake them awake. Chances are they’ll have a message for someone once they’re back among the group.

  9. Close the séance by telling the spirits farewell, thanking them, and asking them to move along. You may want to offer a small blessing or prayer as a way of ending the formal séance, but bear in mind that some spirits like to hang around after the séance has officially finished. If they do, it’s okay. They’re probably just curious, and they may return to visit you later in the evening during a dream sequence.

Tips:

  1. Before you begin your seance, smudge the area with sage or sweetgrass for ritual cleansing.
  2. Make sure you’ve eliminated potential distractions, such as children or ringing telephones. Interestingly, many pets seem to come and go through spirit activity without causing any disruption. Cats in particular tend to be very curious about what’s going on.
  3. Your guests may wish to bring an object that belonged to a deceased person, as a way of strengthening the connection. Photographs are also good links to the dead.

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Need-Fire Spell
The Anglo-Saxon tribes that invaded Britain called Halloween ‘need-fire.’ They lit bonfires to magically endow the sun with the strength to survive the winter. Such bonfire customs survive in Great Britain, but have been moved to the 5th of November and associated with the burning in effigy of Guy Fawkes. Revive the old magic by lighting your own ‘need-fire’ out of doors and add a colourful touch of the modern with fireworks.

Protection against Evil Spirits
The fierce faced lanterns carved out of pumpkins and, in colder climates where pumpkins are rare, turnips, are apotropaic charms intended to ward off evil spirits and protect traveller and household from harm. Make a Jack O’Lantern to keep the ghosties and ghoulies at bay. It is said that when you see the flame flickering, a spirit is near…

Hazelnut Love Spell
A girl might divine who her future husband was going to be by lining up hazelnuts in front of the fire, each of which represented one of the boys that was wooing her. She would then chant, “If you love me, pop and fly. If you hate me, burn and die.”

Water Love Spell
Another tradition from America instructs the curious girl to take a lamp and go out on the night of Hallowe’en to a spring of water and peering in she should see the reflection of her future husband.

Apple Love Spell
To find out who your future partner in life is going to be try this simple divination spell. Take an apple and peel its skin off in one long piece, saying, 

I pare this apple round and again
My sweetheart’s name to flourish plain
I fling the pairing o’er my head
My sweetheart’s letter on the ground be read
The peel should then have landed in the shape of your true-love’s initial.

The Seining Ritual
It has been suggested that the game of Dooking, or Bobbing for Apples, in which a person must catch apples floating in a basin with his teeth is a forgotten survival of the Pagan ‘baptism’ ritual of seining.

The Samhain Spell
The following ‘spell’ is a modern Wiccan composition. 

Be unafraid of Shadows dark 
And to their whispers 
Do Not Hark 
Unfriendly words 
You do Not hear 
No worry, trouble 
Loss or Fear 
No Shadow falls 
Upon your Heart 
We Stand Together 
Though Apart. 
We Stand Together 
Ever Winning 
All our spells 
Together Spinning 
For Every End 
A New Beginning 
Wealthy, Healthy, 
Happy, Free 
If this your Will 
So Mote It Be!

 

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love Apple Spell
Silver Ravenwolf(you can tailor the apple spell for prosperity, protection or spiritual prayer--or you can simply use the apple candles to decorate the table at your next Halloween Party)1 fresh apple as large and as glossy as you can findAn apple corer1 white taper candleAt 15 minutes before midnight on Halloween Eve hold the apple in your hands and ask Spirit to bless the fruit. Hum to yourself thinking of bringing love into your life (but not a specific person..you know the drill) Continue to hum until the apple gets warm in your hands. Insert the apple corer into the stem of the apple and take out the core. Make sure not to make the hole bigger that the circumference of the candle. Hold the candle in your hands and hum again, thinking of bringing love toward you until, like the apple, the candle gets warm in your hands. Put the candle in the apple and say: 
“Great Mother Goddess
Sweet, divine
Bring love to this heart of mine..”

Allow the candle to burn until it goes out but keep a watchful eye on it to make sure accidents don’t happen

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Acorn charm 

Acorn or acornsrooster featherssmall hematite or similar stoneA pinch of powdered Mandrake and/or GinsengA small bag or pouchInscribe acorn(s) with runes, or other symbols of courage and strength. Put acorn(s) into the amulet bag along with the other ingredients.Charge in your magick circle. Have the male wear the bag around his neck, close to his skin.

——————————————————————————————  Pumpkin Abundance Lights
Silver Racenwolf
  6 miniature pumpkins
6 tea lights
knife or pumpkin carving tools
Cut off the tops of the little pumpkins and clean them out (save those seeds!) Cut faces into the pumpkins. Insert tealights. Hold your hands over the pumpkins and chant:

“Gold and silver coins galore all are coming to your door.”

Keep your hands over the pumpkins until your palms tingle or grow warm. Give them to your friends with a smile, and repeat the spell to them. Tell them to light the candle in the pumpkin at midnight on Samhain to activate the spell. ——————————————————-

ALTAR

Altar candles should be orange (represents magick of fire and remainder of fire in autumn leaves), black (collects and absorbs light and keeps you warm), white (sends out energy), silver, and gold (represents Moon and Sun).

Incense may be myrrh or patchouli

Decorate with autumn flowers, small pumpkins, Indian corn, and gourds

Cauldron with black votive candle for petition magick (for writing resolutions on a strip of paper and burning in the candle flame)

Divination or scrying devises — tarot, obsidian ball, pendulum, runes, oghams, Ouija boards, black cauldron or bowl filled with black ink or water, or magick mirror, to name a few

An animal horn, feather or talon as a power symbol (Samhain is tradtionally the meat harvest)

Rosemary (for remembrance of our ancestors), Mullein seeds (a projection for abundance), mugwort (to aid in divination), rue, calendula, sunflower petals and seeds, pumpkin seeds, turnip seeds, apple leaf, sage, mushrooms, wild ginseng, wormwood, tarragon, bay leaf, almond, hazelnut, passionflower, pine needles, nettle, garlic, hemlock cones, mandrake root

At Samhain, witches once gave one another acorns as gifts. During the Burning Times, giving someone an acorn was a secret means of telling that person you were a witch. Acorns are fruits of the oak, one of the most sacred trees to the ancient Celts. They are symbols of protection, fertility, growth, values, and friendship.

 

Black obsidian, smoky quartz, jet, amber, pyrite, garnet, granite, clear quartz, marble, sandstone, gold, diamond, iron, steel, ruby, hematite, brass

At Samhain, witches cast spells to keep anything negative from the past — evil, harm, corruption, greed — out of the future. Cast spells to psychically contact our deceased forebears and retrieve ancient knowledge, thus preserving the great Web that stretches through many generations of human families. 

FOOD

Meat dishes (especially pork), rosemary (for meat seasoning), pumpkin bread, pumpkin pie, roasted pumpkin seeds, mulled cider with spices, candy apples or other apple dishes, potatoes, roasted pumpkin seeds, nuts (representing resurrection and rebirth), especially hazel nuts and acorns.

Mulled cider with spices
Pumpkin Bread
Roasted Pumpkin Seeds
Spiced Hot Chocolate

 

MULLED CIDER WITH SPICES

4-5 cups apple cider
3-4 cloves
2 sticks cinnamon

In a large saucepan, heat cider, but do not boil. Serve in a large cauldron.

 

Pumpkin  Bread

2 cups pumpkin, canned or cooked
1 cup melted butter or margarine, lightly salted
3/4 cup water
4 eggs
3 2/3 cups flour
2 1/4 cups sugar
1 1/2 tsp. nutmeg
2 tsp. cinnamon
2 tsp. baking soda
1 cup raisins
1 cup walnuts, chopped

Blend pumpkin, butter, water, and eggs until mixed. Add flour, sugar, salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, and baking soda. Then add raisins and nuts. Form loaf in greased and floured loaf pans. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour or until top is golden brown.

Roasted pumpkin seeds

Seeds of one pumpkin, washed
1 1/2 Tbl. vegetable oil
Salt, to taste

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Spread clean, dry pumpkin seeds on a lightly greased cookie sheet. Drizzle with vegetable oil and add salt to taste. Bake 25 minutes, stirring occasionally until lightly browned.

SPICED HOT CHOCOLATE

3 ounces semi-sweet dark chocolate, grated
2 cups milk
1/2 tsp each cinnamon and cloves
Dash vanilla extract

Slowly heat chocolate and milk in saucepan until chocolate has melted and blended in. Add cinnamon and cloves and stir. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla, and serve. Makes two servings.

Sandlewood essential oil-

Note: There are two types of “Sandalwood”. East Indian (E.I.) is true, pure Sandalwood which comes from the Sandal tree — West Indian (W.I.) is really Amyris Essential Oil which comes from a different tree and has different medicinal and aromatic properties.

East Indian Sandalwood Essential Oil from The Organic WitchBOTANICAL NAME: santalum album
ORIGIN: India
PARTS USED: wood
DISTILLATION METHOD: steam
FRAGRANCE: balsamic, sweet, woodsy

BLENDS WELL WITH: ambrette, balsam de peru, benzoin, bergamot, clary sage, clove, coriander, cypress, fennel, frankincense, galbanum, geranium, ginger, jasmine, juniper, lemon, myrrh, palmarosa, patchouli, pepper, peppermint, rose, spearmint, vanilla, vetiver, violet.

AROMATIC BENEFITS: aphrodisiac, calming, centering, exhaustion, grounding, relaxing, stress.

MAGICAL USES: anointing, astral projection, attraction, blessing, consecration, exorcism, healing, love, meditation, protection, purification, sacral chakra, spirituality.

PHYSICAL USES: acne, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, carminative, catarrh, chapped skin, constipation, coughs, cystitis, diarrhea, diuretic, drug withdrawal, dry hair, dry skin, emollient, fixative, fragile hair, hangovers, immunity stimulant, insomnia, normal skin, osteoarthritis, sedative, skin conditioner, wrinkles.

Sandalwood Information:

The Essential Oil of Sandalwood is extracted through steam distillation of pieces of wood from matured Sandal trees which are 40-80 years old. The older the tree, the more oil content and richer the aroma. As far as the quality is concerned, the Indian Sandal (botanical name Santalum Album) is considered the best. There are several other varieties available on the market today, two of which are: the Hawaiian Sandal (Santalum Ellipticum), which is priced as that of high quality Santalum album, and the Australian Sandal (Santalum Spicatum) which is used more commercially, since it is more cost-effective.

The main constituents of Essential Oil of Sandal are Beta Santalol, Santyl Acetate and Santalenes.

Sandal Oil and paste of Sandal is used in medicines, skin and beauty treatments, and numerous industrial products including mouth fresheners, edibles, incense sticks, room fresheners, deodorants, perfumes, soaps, lotions, creams, and many more.

Definitions:

Anti-inflammatory: an agent that prevents or counteracts inflammation.
Antiseptic: a substance that inhibits the growth and reproduction of microorganisms.
Antispasmodic: referring to something that suppresses spasms.
Astringent: a substance that draws tissue together, restricting the flow of blood.
Carminative: relieves discomfort of gas in the digestive tract.
Cicatrizant: a healing agent.
Deodorant: Any agent acting to eliminate, reduce, mask, or control odor.
Disinfectant: a substance that kills germs and/or viruses.
Diuretic: increases the amount or frequency of urination.
Expectorant: a substance used to cause or induce expulsion of phlegm from the lungs.
Sedative: Calming, soothing, inducing sleep, tranquilizing.
Tonic: restorative and curative; intended to invigorate.

Safety Warming: No threats have been found when using sandalwood essential oil. Never ingest essential oils without a prescription. Use carrier oil when applying to skin.

Goddess, God, Crystal, and Tarot Card of the day!

Goddess of the Day!

Tempestas
Goddess of storms or sudden weather.

Tempestas is a Goddess of storms or sudden weather. A temple was dedicated to the Tempestates.

Pantheon: Roman
Element: Air

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God of the Day

Noncomala
Creator God.

Noncomala is a Creator God. He formed the earth and the waters, but they were in darkness and clouds. Wading into the river, he met the water-sprite Rutbe, who bore him twins, the sun and moon.

Pantheon: Costarican
Consort: Rutbe

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Crystal of the day!

Youngite

Youngite

Great for healing mental stress that we all experience in everyday life. Mental stress, centering the mind, mental agility, rational thinking, compassion, getting in touch with your inner child.

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Tarot Card of the Day!

Ace of Disks

Ace of Disks

Material Force, Prosperity, Practicality, Trust

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Blessed be!

Tarot Card of the Day

Five of Disks

Five of Disks

Hard Times, Ill Health, Rejection

experiencing hard times
running into material troubles
losing a job or income
feeling insecure
going through a period of hardship
lacking what you need
struggling to make ends meet 

suffering ill health
feeling run down and tired
refusing to take care of yourself
neglecting your body and its needs
feeling ragged around the edges
getting medical attention
abusing your body 

being rejected
lacking support
having the door slammed in your face
taking an unpopular position
being ostracized
feeling excluded
standing alone
receiving disapproval

OPPOSING CARDS: Some Possibilities

REINFORCING CARDS: Some Possibilities

DESCRIPTION

The two figures on the Five of Pentacles are cold, hungry, tired, sick and poor. They show us what it feels like to be without – to lack the basic ingredients of life. This is the specter that haunts so many in our world – a reality that is all too immediate. Those of us who are more fortunate may not have experienced this extreme, but we still recognize suffering. When we do not have what we want and need, it hurts.

In readings, the Five of Pentacles can represent several kinds of lack. First, there is poor health. It is hard to tackle life’s challenges when we do not have our vitality and strength. This card can be a signal that you are neglecting the needs of your body. You are moving away from complete physical well-being, so you must take steps to discover and correct the problem.

This card can also be a sign of material and economic setbacks. There is no doubt that life is harder when we lack money or a decent job. When we are struggling to make ends meet, all other problems are magnified. Even if we are comfortable, we can still feel insecure, afraid that misfortune will take away all that we have worked for.

The Five of Pentacles can also represent rejection or lack of acceptance. We are social animals and feel pain when excluded from our group. We want to be included, not only for our emotional well-being, but also for mutual support. Being rejected can mean physical hardship as well.

The Five of Pentacles relates to material lack, but it also has a spiritual component. From the stained glass window, we can guess that these two figures are outside of a church. Comfort is so close at hand, but they fail to see it. The church symbolizes our spirits which are perfect and whole in every way. We are meant to enjoy abundance in all areas of life, but sometimes we forget that this is our birthright. Whenever you experience hardship, know that it is only temporary. Look for the spiritual center that will take you in and give you shelter.

 

 

 

 

God of the day!

Chenti-cheti
Crocodile god.

Chenti-cheti (Khenti-kheti) (“foremost retreater”) is a crocodile god of Athribis in Lower Egypt. In the New Kingdom he was identified with Horus, taking on the shape of a falcon. In an inscription found on a statue of Khenti-Kheti he is described as “the chancellor of the king of Lower Egypt, the sole friend, the great superintendent Khenti-Kheti.”

Pantheon: Egyptian
Animals: Crocodile, Falcon, Bull

Everyone getting ready for Samhain?

Make Cakes and Ale or Fall foods and wine/cider, and decorate the house or apartment with pumpkins, and other autumn veggies. Grapevines make beautiful decorations for altars during this time. Alchemy and symbols are other ways of easy decorations. You could easily draw the symbols for the elements and spirit if you do not know what they are look in the top and in one of my pages you will find it. The veil to the other side is getting thinner and thinner as we near the day of the dead! I have items of loved ones who have crossed over and these are the types of things that can help you connect. You do not have to spend alot of money to celebrate this holiday, just go with what feels right to you! draw pictures, even of candles. All of it is just visual points with the right intent any thing can be done!

Blessed be!

History of Samhain, Rituals and Spells

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njoJTpXptks

Samhain is coming! The harvest rituals are complete! The day of the dead is ever so near! The magical veil to the other world is at its thinnest at this time! The fields are bare, the leaves have fallen from the trees, and the skies are going gray and cold. It is the time of year when the earth has died and gone dormant. Every year on October 31 (or May 1, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere) the Sabbat we call Samhain presents us with the opportunity to once more celebrate the cycle of death and rebirth. For many Pagan and Wiccan traditions, Samhain is a time to reconnect with our ancestors, and honor those who have died. This is the time when the veil between our world and the spirit realm is thin, so it’s the perfect time of year to make contact with the dead. You may want to take a moment to read up on: 

Samhain history!

What is Samhain?:

Samhain is known by most folks as Halloween, but for Wiccans and Pagans it’s considered a Sabbat to honor the ancestors who came before us. It’s a good time to contact the spirit world with a seance, because it’s the time when the veil between this world and the next is at its thinnest.

Myths and Misconceptions:

Contrary to a popular Internet-based (and Chick Tract-encouraged) rumor, Samhain was not the name of some ancient Celtic god of death, or of anything else, for that matter. Religious scholars agree that the word Samhain (pronounced “sow-en”) comes from the Gaelic “Samhuin,” but they’re divided on whether it means the end or beginning of summer. After all, when summer is ending here on earth, it’s just beginning in the Underworld. Samhain actually refers to the daylight portion of the holiday, on November 1st.

All Hallow Mass:

Around the eighth century or so, the Catholic Church decided to use November 1st as All Saints Day. This was actually a pretty smart move on their part – the local pagans were already celebrating that day anyway, so it made sense to use it as a church holiday. All Saints’ became the festival to honor any saint who didn’t already have a day of his or her own. The mass which was said on All Saints’ was called Allhallowmas – the mass of all those who are hallowed. The night before naturally became known as All Hallows Eve, and eventually morphed into what we call Halloween.

The Witch’s New Year:

Sunset on Samhain is the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The old year has passed, the harvest has been gathered, cattle and sheep have been brought in from the fields, and the leaves have fallen from the trees. The earth slowly begins to die around us.

This is a good time for us to look at wrapping up the old and preparing for the new in our lives. Think about the things you did in the last twelve months. Have you left anything unresolved? If so, now is the time to wrap things up. Once you’ve gotten all that unfinished stuff cleared away, and out of your life, then you can begin looking towards the next year.

Honoring the Ancestors:

For some of us, Samhain is when we honor our ancestors who came before us. If you’ve ever done genealogy research, or if you’ve had a loved one die in the past year, this is the perfect night to celebrate their memory. If we’re fortunate, they will return to communicate with us from beyond the veil, and offer advice, protection and guidance for the upcoming year.

If you want to celebrate Samhain in the Celtic tradition, spread the festivities out over three consecutive days. You can hold a ritual and feast each night. Be flexible, though, so you can work around trick-or-treating schedules!

Samhain Rituals:

Try one  or all — of these rituals to celebrate Samhain and welcome the new year.

  • Celebrating the end of the year and harvest!

    Samhain represents, among other things, the end of the harvest season. If you haven’t picked it by Samhain, you probably won’t be eating it! The gardens have died off by now, and where we once saw lush green plants, there is nothing left but dry and dead stalks. The perennials have shut down for the season too, going dormant so that they may return to us in the spring. Animals are brought in from the fields for the winter — and if you’ve ever had a spider come wandering into your living room one chilly October night, you know that even the insects are trying to find a place to stay warm.

    Difficulty: Average
    Time Required: Varied

    Here’s How:

    1. If we had lived a few hundreds of years ago, we would not only have brought our cows and sheep in from the pastures. Most likely we’d slaughter a few of them, as well as some pigs and goats, smoking the meat so it would last through the cold months. Our grain that we picked back at Lughnasadh has been baked into bread, and all of our herbs have been gathered, and hang from the rafters in the kitchen. The harvest is over, and now it’s time to settle in for winter with the coziness of a warm fireplace, heavy blankets, and big pots of comfort food on the stovetop.
    2. If you want to celebrate Samhain as the time of harvest’s end, you can do so as a single ritual, or as the first of three days of ceremony. If you don’t have a permanent altar in place, set up a table to leave in place for the three days prior to Samhain. This will act as a your family’s temporary altar for the Sabbat. Decorate the altar with symbols of late fall, such as:
      • Skulls, skeletons, grave rubbings, ghosts
      • Harvest food such as pumpkins, squash, root vegetables
      • Nuts and berries, dark breads
      • Dried leaves and acorns
      • A cornucopia filled with an abundance of fruit and veggies
      • Mulled cider, wine, or mead

       

    3. To begin your ceremony, prepare a meal for the family — and this is something that everyone can get involved in. Put emphasis on fruits and vegetables, and wild game meat if available. Also make sure you have a loaf of a dark bread like rye or pumpernickel and a cup of apple cider or wine. Set the dinner table with candles and a fall centerpiece, and put all the food on the table at once. Consider the dinner table a sacred space.
    4. Gather everyone around the table, and say:Tonight is the first of three nights,
      on which we celebrate Samhain.
      It is the end of the harvest, the last days of summer,
      and the cold nights wait on the other side for us.
      The bounty of our labor, the abundance of the harvest,
      the success of the hunt, all lies before us.
      We thank the earth for all it has given us this season,
      and yet we look forward to winter,
      a time of sacred darkness.
    5. Take the cup of cider or wine, and lead everyone outside. Make this a ceremonial and formal occasion. If you have a vegetable garden, great! Go there now — otherwise, just find a nice grassy spot in your yard. Each person in the family takes the cup in turn and sprinkles a little bit of cider onto the earth, saying:Summer is gone, winter is coming.
      We have planted and
      we have watched the garden grow,
      we have weeded,
      and we have gathered the harvest.
      Now it is at its end.
    6. If you have any late-fall plants still waiting to be picked, gather them up now. Collect a bundle of dead plants and use them to make a straw man or woman. If you follow a more masculine path, he may be your King of Winter, and rule your home until spring returns. If you follow the Goddess in her many forms, make a female figure to represent the Goddess as hag or crone in winter.Once that is done, go back inside and bring your King of Winter into your home with much pomp and circumstance. Place him on your table and prop him up with a plate of his own, and when you sit down to eat, serve him first.
    7. Begin your meal with the breaking of the dark bread, and make sure you toss a few crumbs outside for the birds afterwards. Keep the King of Winter in a place of honor all season long — you can put him back outside in your garden on a pole to watch over next spring’s seedlings, and eventually burn him at your Beltane celebration.When you are finished with your meal, put the leftovers out in the garden. Wrap up the evening by playing games, such as bobbing for apples or telling spooky stories before a bonfire.

    What You Need

    • A table to use as your Samhain altar
    • Decorations that represent the late autumn season
    • A meal with lots of veggies, fruit, and bread
    • A cup of wine or cider
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  • Honoring Animals Ritual for Samhain

This ceremony is designed to honor the spirits of the animals – both wild and domestic. Man’s relationship with animals goes back thousands and thousands of years. They have been a source of food and clothing. They have protected us from the things that lurk in the darkness. They have provided comfort and warmth. In some cases, they have even raised and nurtured our discarded children, as in the case of Romulus and Remus. If you have animals in your home — pets or livestock — this is their night. Feed them before you feed the humans in your family. Put some food out for any wild animals that may happen by as well.

Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Varied

Here’s How:

  1. If you have a pet that has passed away during this last year, you may want to include a photo or keepsake of them on your table during this rite.Prepare a stew for your family that includes small amounts of as many different meats as you may have available — beef, pork, game, chicken, etc. If your family is vegetarian or vegan, designate a non-meat ingredient to represent each animal and adapt the ritual as needed, eliminating lines that reference the eating of animals. When your stew is ready, gather the family around the altar table you prepared during the previous night’s Harvest End Ritual.
  2. Place the stew pot in the center of the table, with a large serving spoon or ladle. Make sure you have some good dark bread to eat as well. Each member of the family should have a bowl and spoon handy. Say:Samhain has come, and it is the end of the Harvest.
    The crops are in from the fields,
    And the animals are preparing for the coming winter.
    Tonight, we honor the animals in our lives.
    Some have died that we may eat.
    Some have provided us with love.
    Some have protected us from that which would do us harm.
    Tonight, we thank them all.
  3. Go around the family in a circle. Each person should take a scoop of stew from the pot and place it in their bowl. Younger children may need an adult’s help with this. As each person gets their helping, say:Blessed are the animals,
    Those who die that we may eat.
    Blessed are the animals,
    Those we love and who love us in return.
    When every family member has their stew, each takes a piece of bread. As they do, say:As the Wheel of the Year continues to turn,
    The harvest has ended, and the grain has been threshed.
    The animals sleep for the winter.
    We thank them for their gifts.
  4. Take your time finishing your meal. If you have pets, don’t be surprised if they come visit while you’re eating your stew tonight — animals tend to be very aware of the spiritual plane! If there is any stew left over, leave some out for the spirits. Any extra bread can be thrown outside for the wild animals and birds.

Tips:

  1. If you want to mix a bit of stew in with your pet’s everyday food, it’s a good idea to check with your veterinarian first.

What You Need

  • An altar table
  • A pot of stew
  • Some hearty dark bread

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  • Energy Raising in Wicca (Cone of Power):

Magic requires the intent or the power of the Will. The Will (of a person or group of people) `works’ the energy, ad this energy creates the desired effect. In order to do magic, the strength of Will, and an ability to raise energy are required. These come with much training and practise.

Raising & working Energy-  can be achieved with practise of the following methods and techniques. Most of these work because they change the mind-state or Consciousness of the person.

1 Meditations, Yoga &  deep breathing techniques to calming the body & mind and creating inner peace.

*2 Repetitive singing, chanting  & dancing to reach trance-states.

*3 Rhythmic drumming, clapping or even blood control using scourging (whips!)

4 Taking alcohol or other mind-altering substances to reach altered states (doesn’t mean you’ll then be in a fully aware state to wield your Will!)

5 Sex / Great Rite  (which affects breathing, rhythmic stimulation, pleasure and altered states!)

In our public rituals, we work with technqiues 2 & 3 as listed above for raising energy in aa wiccan circle.

Spiral Dance:

This is where, within a consecrated Wicca Circle-space, participating members will link hands, do a chant, and move in a spiral-dance manner. (video demo coming soon)

Cone of Power – is said to be created when a group of magicians/ wiccans generate energy inside a consecrated circle (sacred space), and pour forth all their energies from around the Circle.  The energies raised will rise higher in a cone.

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  • Honoring dead Ancestors Ritual

For many modern Pagans and Wiccans, there has been a resurgence of interest in our family histories. We want to know where we came from and whose blood runs through our veins. Although ancestor worship has traditionally been found more in Africa and Asia, many Pagans with European heritage are beginning to feel the call of their ancestry. This rite can be performed either by itself, or on the third night of Samhain, following the End of Harvest celebration and the Honoring of the Animals.

Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Varied

Here’s How:

  1. First, decorate your altar table — you may have already gotten it set up during the End of Harvest rite or for the Ritual for Animals. Decorate your altar with family photos and heirlooms. If you have a family tree chart, place that on there as well. Add postcards, flags, and other symbols of the country your ancestors came from. If you’re lucky enough to live near where your family members are buried, make a grave rubbing and add that as well. In this case, a cluttered altar is perfectly acceptable — after all, each of us is a blend of many different people and cultures.
  2. Have a meal standing by to eat with the ritual. Include lots of dark bread, apples, fall vegetables, and a jug of cider or wine. Set your dinner table, with a place for each family member, and one extra plate for the ancestors. You may want to bake some Cakes.If your family has household guardians, include statues or masks of them on your altar. Finally, if a relative has died this year, place a candle for them on the altar. Light candles for other relatives, and as you do so, say the person’s name aloud. It’s a good idea to use tealights for this, particularly if you have a lot of relatives to honor.
  3. Once all the candles have been lit, the entire family should circle the altar. The oldest adult present leads the ritual. Say:This is the night when the gateway between
    our world and the spirit world is thinnest.
    Tonight is a night to call out those who came before us.
    Tonight we honor our ancestors.
    Spirits of our ancestors, we call to you,
    and we welcome you to join us for this night.
    We know you watch over us always,
    protecting us and guiding us,
    and tonight we thank you.
    We invite you to join us and share our meal.
  4. The oldest family member then serves everyone else a helping of whatever dishes have been prepared, except for the wine or cider. A serving of each food goes on the ancestors’ plate before the other family members recieve it. During the meal, share stories of ancestors who are no longer among the living — this is the time to remember Grandpa’s war stories he told you as a child, tell about when Aunt Millie used salt instead of sugar in the cake, or reminisce about summers spent at the family homestead in the mountains.
  5. When everyone has finished eating, clear away all the dishes, except for the ancestors’ plate. Pour the cider or wine in a cup, and pass it around the circle (it should end at the ancestor’s place). As each person recieves the cup, they recite their genealogy, like so:I am Susan, daughter of Joyce, the daughter of Malcolm, son of Jonathan…and so forth. Feel free to add in place names if you like, but be sure to include at least one generation that is deceased. For younger family members, you may wish to have them only recite back to their grandparents, just because otherwise they can get confused.
  6. Go back as many generations as you can, or (in the case of people who have done a lot of genealogy research) as many as you can remember. You may be able to trace your family back to William the Conqueror, but that doesn’t mean you have it memorized. After each person recites their ancestry, they drink from the cider cup and pass it to the next person.
  7. A quick note here — many people are adopted. If you are one them, you are fortunate enough to be able to choose whether you wish to honor your adoptive family, your biological family, or a combination of the two. If you don’t know the names of your birth parents or their ancestry, there’s nothing wrong with saying, “Daughter of a family unknown.” It’s entirely up to you. The spirits of your ancestors know who you are, even if you don’t know them yet.
  8. After the cup has made its way around the table, place it in front of the ancestors’ plate. This time, a younger person in the family takes over, saying:This is the cup of remembrance.
    We remember all of you.
    You are dead but never forgotten,
    and you live on within us.
    Take some time to meditate on the value of family, how fortunate we are to be able to know the connections of kin and clan, and the value of heritage. If your family has a tradition of music or folktales, share those as a way to wrap up the ritual. Otherwise, allow the candles to burn out on their own. Leave the plate and cup on the altar overnight.

Tips:

  1. If you didn’t do a separate ritual for animals, you can add photos and candles for deceased pets to your family altar.
  2. If you like, you may wish to follow this ritual with a Seance.

What You Need

  • Items to represent your family members
  • A meal to eat
  • A cup of cider or wine to drink
  • Candles

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  • Hold a Seance on Samhain Ritual:

A séance is an event that can either be fantastic, or a real mess. Which one it is will depend on how much preparation goes into it. With a little bit of planning and thought ahead of time, you can pave the way for your séance to go smoothly. Certainly, it’s a good idea to expect the unexpected — after all, the dead are hardly predictable — but by setting yourself a few guidelines in advance, you can make sure that everyone has the best experience possible.

Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Varied

Here’s How:

  1. Plan your guest list: Figure out how many people you’re going to have — and make sure the space you’re using will allow them all. If your living room only seats eight people comfortably, don’t invite fifteen! Also, be sure that everyone attending is open-minded to the spirit world. People who are adamantly “non-believers” bring a certain amount of negative energy, and this can be disruptive. You may also find that it adversely effects your communication with the spirits during your séance.
  2. Create a Spirit-Friendly Atmosphere: Most people like to conduct a séance at a round or oval table, but if neither is available, don’t worry. Drape the table with fabric or sheets — some people prefer light colors to attract “friendly” spirits, but it’s a matter or personal preference. If you use incense, be sure that no one in your group is allergic to it. Place incense somewhere away from the table, rather than on the table itself.Candles are a nice addition as well — not only do they provide some visibility, but there’s a school of thought that believes spirits are attracted to heat and light sources.
  3. Common Sense: Help everyone get comfortable by offering refreshments before you begin. Make sure that guests will be respectful of the spirits, and of other guests. Turn off all cell phones. If anyone needs to go to the bathroom or have a smoke, do so before you begin. Set the thermostat at a comfortable temperature — remember that spirit activity can cause some fluctuation in levels of cold or heat. Once everyone is seated, you can help everyone relax by doing a short guided mediation, offering a prayer, or casting a protective circle, if your tradition requires you to do so.
  4. During the Seance: Although many people like to do this, you don’t have to hold hands to raise energy. In fact, if a séance goes on too long, it can get downright uncomfortable. Whoever is acting as the leader of the séance — the medium — should ask the spirits to join the group. If there is a specific spirit you are trying to contact, ask for them by name. For example, now would be the time to say, “Dear Auntie Gertrude, we respectfully ask that you honor us with your presence this evening.” In some séances, spirits are summoned by chanting — this will be up to your medium to decide on.
  5. As long as the spirits seem willing to reply, you can carry on a question and answer session with them. Bear in mind that spirits respond in many different ways. Sometimes there will be a tangible reaction — a tap, a thump, a soft breeze. Other times — particularly if you have a room full of very psychically gifted people — the spirit may choose to respond through another person. This may be the medium, or any other guest. The individual may simply “get a message” to pass along, which they would then share, such as, “Your Auntie Gertrude wants you to know she isn’t in pain any more.”
  6. Party Time: Sometimes, particularly if you have a group of psychically gifted individuals as guests, you may get several spirits arriving all at once, chattering away. This is not cause for alarm, but it does take some managing, because they’ve all got something to say. Treat it like you would any other conversation with a large group of people — let each spirit get their turn to deliver the message they came with, and then move on to the next one. Also, bear in mind that not all spirits are from departed humans — deceased pets may also have a message to pass along.
  7. Unwanted Entities: Just like at any other party, sometimes a séance will bring an uninvited guest. In this case, when you have a spirit that seems malevolent or mischievous, someone needs to let them know they’re unwelcome. Typically, this will be the medium who is leading the séance, who will usually say something like, “You are not wanted here, but we thank you for your presence. Now it is time for you to move on.”If an entity arrives that seems angry or hostile and will not leave, no matter what you do, end the séance. Chances are good that it’s been attracted to someone in your group who is dysfunctional.
  8. Closing the Door: When you’re done with the séance, it’s important that guests thank the spirits for coming to visit. After all, you would do so if you had living guests drop in!If one of your attendees seems to have slipped into a trance or a sleep-like state during the séance, allow them to return gradually, on their own. Do NOT shake them awake. Chances are they’ll have a message for someone once they’re back among the group.
  9. Close the séance by telling the spirits farewell, thanking them, and asking them to move along. You may want to offer a small blessing or prayer as a way of ending the formal séance, but bear in mind that some spirits like to hang around after the séance has officially finished. If they do, it’s okay. They’re probably just curious, and they may return to visit you later in the evening during a dream sequence.

Tips:

  1. Before you begin your seance, smudge the area with sage or sweetgrass for ritual cleansing.
  2. Make sure you’ve eliminated potential distractions, such as children or ringing telephones. Interestingly, many pets seem to come and go through spirit activity without causing any disruption. Cats in particular tend to be very curious about what’s going on.
  3. Your guests may wish to bring an object that belonged to a deceased person, as a way of strengthening the connection. Photographs are also good links to the dead.

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  •  Honoring the God and Goddess during Samhain:

By Samhain, the Goddess has entered her incarnation of Crone. She is the Old One, the earth mother, the wise one we turn to when we need advice. She teaches us that sometimes we must let go in order to move on. The God, at Samhain, is the Horned One, the stag of great antlers, the god of the wild hunt. He is the animal that dies so that we may eat, and the grains and corn that once lived in the field before our harvest. We can honor these late-fall aspects of both the Goddess and the God in one ritual.

Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Varied

Here’s How:

  1. Begin by casting a circle, if your tradition requires it. Prior to starting the ceremony, place three sheaves of corn or wheat around the ritual space. You’ll also need a statue or other image of the God and of the Goddess at the center of your altar. Around the statues, place five candles — red and black to represent the dark aspect of the Goddess, green and brown to symbolize the wild God, and white for the hearth and home.
  2. Place a plate of dark bread, enough for each person present, near the center of the altar, along with a cup of wine or cider. Circle the altar. The youngest person present will act as the Handmaiden, and the oldest as the High Priest (HP) or High Priestess (HPs). If you’re performing this rite as a solitary, simply take on both parts. The HPs lights the red and black candles, and says:A pair of candles is lit
    in honor of the Goddess.
    She is Maiden and Mother throughout the year
    and tonight we honor her as Crone.
  3. Next, the HPs lights the brown and green candles, saying:A pair of candles is lit
    in honor of the God.
    He is wild and fertile and animal
    and tonight we honor him as the Horned God.
    The Handmaiden takes the bread and walks the circle with the plate, allowing each person to tear off a chunk. As they do so, she says:May the blessings of the Goddess be upon you.The cup of wine or cider is passed around, and each person takes a sip. As they do, the Handmaiden should say:May the blessings of the God be upon you.
  4. The Handmaiden then lights the fifth candle, for the hearth, saying:This candle is lit
    in honor of hearth and home.
    The mother and father, the Goddess and God,
    watch over us tonight as we honor them.
    The HPs then takes over, saying:We light these five candles
    for the powerful Goddess
    and her mighty horned consort, the God,
    and for the safety of home and hearth.
    On this, the night of Samhain,
    when the Goddess is a wise Crone,
    and the God is a wild stag,
    we honor them both.
  5. The Handmaiden says:This is a time between the worlds,
    a time of life and a time of death.
    This is a night unlike any other night.
    Ancient ones, we ask your blessing.
    Goddess, great Crone, mother of all life,
    we thank you for your wisdom.
    Horned God, master of the wild hunt, keeper of the forest,
    we thank you for all that you provide.
    At this time, the rest of the group may also say thanks. If you wish to make an offering to the God and Goddess, now is the time to place it upon the altar.
  6. Once all offerings have been made, and thanks given, take a moment to meditate on the new beginnings of Samhain. Consider the gifts that the gods have given you over the past year, and think about how you might show them your gratitude in the coming twelve months. As the old year dies, make room in the new year for new things in your life. You may not know yet what’s coming, but you can certainly imagine, dream and hope. Tonight, this night between the worlds, is the perfect time to imagine what things may come.End the ritual in the way called for by your tradition.

Tips:

  1. Decorate your altar with symbols of the God — antlers, acorns, pine cones, phallic symbols — and representations of the Goddess, such as red flowers, cups, pomegranates, etc.
  2. If your tradition honors a specific pair of male and female deities, feel free to substitute their names in this ritual wherever it says God or Goddess.

What You Need

  • Five candles, in red, black, brown, green and white.
  • A loaf of dark bread
  • A cup of cider or wine
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Blessed Be! Hope you all enjoy and try some of these!
  • Sabbats (bellastarenterprise.wordpress.com)

Goddess, God, Crystal & Tarot Card of the Day

Rati
Goddess of love, carnal desire, lust, passion and sexual pleasure.

Rati

Rati is a Goddess of love, carnal desire, lust, passion and sexual pleasure. She is the daughter of Prajapati Daksha and chief consort of Kama , the god of love. She is depicted as a beautiful maiden, often alongside Kama.

Pantheon: Hindu
Animals: Parrot
Consort: Kama
Planet: Venus
Symbols: Sword, Bow

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God of the day

Suijin
God of Water.

Suijin is a God of Water. He is the guardian of fishing folk, and patron of fertility, motherhood, and easy childbirth. The term refers to the heavenly and earthly manifestations of the benevolent Shinto divinity of water.

Pantheon: Japanese
Abode: Water, Lakes, Ponds, Wells
Animals: Eels, Fish
Element: Water
Offerings: Cucumbers

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Crystal of the Day!

Pyrolusite

Pyrolusite

Associated with hope, optimism, confidence, determination and material comfort. Heals energetic disturbances. Repels negative energy.

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Tarot of the day:

Knight of Swords

Knight of Swords

Direct, Authoritative, Incisive, Knowledgeable, Logical

As Change and Movement: This is a card that indicates a time and environment of rapid changes. In the positive, there are rapid thoughts; ideas fly, problems and challenges quickly appear and are quickly solved. In the negative, there might be too much thinking. This is the most “Knight” of the Knights, meaning things will feel restlessness, will change direction in a blink, or go from zero-to-sixty in a second. There will be an inclination to argue. It could be frightening and worrying, but also mentally stimulating.

As a Teen or “Teen-like” Person: Too smart for his own good, the Knight of Swords is also too talkative. He/she is the sort to get into a dozen flame wars on a dozen internet chat sites. This is the sort of teen/teen-like person who will questions his teachers (bosses), likes to play devil’s advocate, and argue with his friends and family just for the sake of arguing.

Cool and logical, he can be very smart and amazing at problem-solving. This, however, can make him arrogant, cold, even cruel to those he views as not so bright. This sharp mind and sharp tongue can also lead him to spread gossip or nasty rumors just to see what will happen. He may be an internet troll or hacker and likely to cause serious trouble or get into serious trouble because of it. He fails to consider the consequences of his words, and can be uncaring about others feelings.

He is, however, a good Knight to have on your side, as he will find clever ways to win in battle. If there’s anything this knight will fight and die for, it is for freedom of information and speech.